What Makes A Strong Proposal

Impact — Identifying a need, such as:

  • Improving service delivery
  • Expanding model programs
  • Collaborating with other agencies
  • Testing pilot concepts that may have broader applicability
  • Emphasizing prevention or early intervention
  • Answering the key question: How will people measurably benefit as a result of the proposed program or activity?

Effectiveness — Demonstrating value and efficacy:

  • Addressing identified needs
  • Using knowledge or evidence of measures that work
  • Offering measurable observable outcomes (effects on the lives of children, older adults, or arts and culture institutions)

Feasibility — Proving practicability:

  • Adhering consistently to the agency’s core mission, capability, and plan
  • Addressing the issues with appropriate methodology
  • Managing with available assets
  • Demonstrating sufficient organizational leadership to achieve program goals

Sustainability — Practicing fiscal responsibility:

  • Requesting an appropriate amount to the size of the agency’s budget
  • Having access to stable or diverse finances
  • Offering a thoughtful, realistic plan for continuing the project beyond the term of the grant period

Projects Likely to Receive Support:

  1. Projects that demonstrably improve the lives of young children, adolescents, and older adults
  2. Specific projects that strengthen an arts organization’s capability and stability
  3. Projects that involve collaborative activities across multiple agencies that through combining assets, ideas, and program capacities try to meet a general need
  4. Projects in which local organizations bring proven national program models to Maricopa County
  5. Projects that implement models of service that might apply to various settings in Maricopa County
  6. Programs that multiply results by involving volunteers
  7. Organizations that have identified a component of their strategic plan for support

Projects Unlikely to Receive Support:

  1. Projects that consume a large percentage of an organization’s annual operating budget and that will therefore prove difficult to sustain after the grant ends
  2. Projects dedicated to meeting ongoing marketing or fundraising costs
  3. Projects that seek financial backing for future seasons’ performances or productions
  4. Capital campaigns that represent an inordinate share of the overall campaign goal
  5. Projects that seek to cover capital and operating costs for private or public schools
  6. Direct healthcare services in which Piper Trust funds would insufficiently bear on the overall need
  7. Projects involving medical research that would require enormous commitments of the sort typically available only at the national level
  8. Organizations that have insufficient support or commitment (both in terms of finances and personnel) from the board or a capital campaign cabinet